We are not currently admitting new students into the program.

Course Requirements

Transfer Policy for CIS coursework

Since the computing world is constantly changing, caution is used in accepting transfer credit based on the age of the credits. Generally, the course must have been taken within 10 years of enrollment at the College. Some exceptions to this 10-year rule may apply when the student is currently employed in the field. All CIS major courses must have been taken within three years of enrollment at the College. One-half of the total hours required must be taken at the College. Students also may choose to gain credit through a CLEP exam or APL.

Computer Information Systems Major (50 credit hours)

The Computer Information Systems Major is available through our Woods Online distance program and on campus. In addition to general study requirements, the Computer Information Systems Major requires the completion of 50 credit hours of computer-related coursework.

CIS Major - Core Courses

50 credit hours are required to meet major requirements.

Studies the accounting cycle leading to the development and use of financial statements. Emphasis is on the proprietorship type of business organization.

Focuses on the nature of law-making, the legal processes by which law is applied to resolve disputes, the value and policy that are the basis for our law and legal processes and the role of law and litigation in the conduct of everyday business affairs. Emphasis is on the fundamentals of the legal system, both philosophical and technical, which facilitate business operations and discourage or control harmful business practices. Ethical implications and standards to which business conduct should conform are considered and stressed.

The first programming course, required for all Computer Information Systems, Accounting Information Systems, and Mathematics majors. Students use the Visual Studio.Net interface to build GUI (graphical user interface), create multimedia, process files and databases as well as Internet and World Wide Web based client/server networking. Prerequisite: (WED only): CS250, waived for Math majors.

A management-oriented survey course of computer-based information systems (IS) and an overview of IS as a discipline. Presented are a variety of IS concepts and topics used by information specialists, including: hardware, software, systems theory, data organization, telecommunications and networking, decision support, and systems design, with a focus on business information systems.

The second half of CS161. Advanced topics include the use of arrays, creating objects and classes, graphics, files, and multimedia. This course is required of all CIS majors and minors and is recommended for AIS and Digital Media majors. Prerequisites: CS 161 and CS 250.

Presents a practical approach to systems and design, integrating traditional development methods with current technologies. The five phases of the traditional System Development Life Cycle are covered in detail. The various tools and techniques the Systems Analyst, Programmer/Analyst, or IS Manager may use are emphasized. Classical and structured tools for describing data flow, data structures, process flow, file design, input/output design and program specifications are applied to documentation systems. Surveys other important skills for the System Analyst such as fact-finding, communications, project management, and cost/benefit analysis. Prerequisites CS 161 and CS 250.

Teaches the basic concepts of C and C++, but places the emphasis on C#. C# is an interactive, GUI (graphical user interface) language built as part of Visual Studio.Net languages. Students will learn to use the C# language to build web interfaces using object-orientedprogramming. Concepts taught include using the IDE interface, manipulating windows, using iteration, repetition, and sequence structures. Prerequisites CS 161, CS 261, and CS 250.

Introduces the student to a number of Internet programming languages. Emphasis is placed on Cascading Style Sheets (CSS) and JavaScript in addition to HTML/XHTML. Prerequisites: CS 261.

An overview of computer telecommunications and networking theories and concepts. Introduces the student to fundamental telecommunications and data communication concepts. Included are various topics such as communications media, equipment and transmission; protocols; network basics; the various LAN topologies; wide area and distributed networks. Network management and information network applications. Prerequisite: CS 250.

Presents a practical approach to database design, implementation and maintenance by utilizing Microsoft Access projects to supplement the theory covered in the primary textbook. Covers the fundamental concepts of relational databases and their design including: the DBMS (database management system); the relational model, logical and physical database design; design tools such as E-R diagrams and data flow diagrams; data structures; entities, attributes and tables; the Entity-Relationship model; normalization; and database implementation. Winter, odd years. Prerequisites: CS 161 and CS 250.

A three-hour introduction to various technical and administrative aspects of Information Security and Assurance. Provides the foundation for understanding the key issues associated with protecting information assets, determining the level of protection and response to securiy incidence, and designing a consistent, reasonable information security system, with appropriate intrusion detection and reporting features. Students will be exposed to the spectrum of security activities, methods, methodologies, and procedures. Coverage will include an overview of the Information Security Planning and Staffing functions. This course is geared toward introductory, technical, and managerial students in a lab environment with exercises in various operating systems. Prerequisites: CS 250 and CS 261.

Senior capstone course. The student must complete at least one approved professional certification. These include but are not limited to ACP, MSCA, MSCE, A+, Novell's CAN, CNE, and CNI. All of the above must be taken on-line. The student seeking ACP must complete an approved senior project which includes identifying a problem that can be solved with a computerized system, analyzing the problem, designing a solution, coding, testing and documenting the new system, as well as training the user and making a formal presentation to a faculty panel. Upon successful completion the student may apply for her Associate Computer Professional (ACP) certification from the Institute for the Certification of Computer Professionals (ICCP) without sitting for the formal exam. Obtaining multiple certifications can count as additional credit to meet CIS major requirements. Prerequisites: Senior status and a CIS major.

CIS Major - Electives

Choose from the following courses to meet the 50 credit hour requirement.

Introduces student to industry-standard web design software in order to develop the techniques and skills necessary to create functional and easily navigated websites. Applications of these skills are made in subjective and applied projects. Fall, every year. Course fee. Prerequisites: AD157, AD257 or consent of instructor.

Introduces student to industry-standard interactive software in order to develop the techniques and skills necessary to convey information and entertainment through interactivity. Application of these skills are made in subjective and applied projects. Winter, odd years. course fee. Prerequisite: AD157, AD257.

Studies accounting for corporations and introduces accounting for management decision making. Builds on the concepts of BU 121. Prerequisite: BU 121.

Introduces the student to the fundamentals of E-Commerce. Includes discussing the process for organizing a business on the Internet, and a basic understanding of the requirements for an E-Business. The course will consider examples of using E-Commerce for business to business (B2B) and directly to the consumer. Considers related technologies and emerging trends.

Develops a basic understanding of the methods of securing and allocating financial resources within a firm. Emphasis is on financial decision making and the associated knowledge, principles and techniques. Prerequisites: BU 122 and MA 253.

A two-credit hour, "hands-on," advanced course in application software. This is an advanced machine-oriented, performance-based course utilizing the current Microsoft Office software packages: Word, Excel, Access, and PowerPoint. Prerequisite: CS 101.

Focus is on formulating strategies, formatting research expressions: (1) efficiently searching the web; (2) using specialized databases and library catalogs; (3) searching discussion groups and newsgroups and evaluating information, data/warehouse mining, and super computing. Additional hours can be added for research projects. As needed.

The study of designated or selected topics to serve the special needs and interests of the student not included in the regular course offerings. As needed. Prerequisites: sophomore or junior status.

Introduces students to various concepts and areas of expertise surrounding the field of computer information systems. The Guide to Computer Forensics and Investigation presents proper methods to conduct a computer forensics investigation beginning with a discussion of ethics, while mapping to the objectives of the International Association of Computer Investigative Specialists (IACIS) certification. Students should have a working knowledge of hardware and operating systems to maximize their success on projects and exercises throughout the text. Prerequisites: CJ 111 and CS 101.

Provides the student an opportunity to work with Apache and Linux for web site testing and evaluation. Includes documenting strategies for site evaluation (data mining). The student learns the basics of risk management emerging trends and issues. Prerequisites: junior status or permission of instructor.

The study of designated or selected topics to serve the special needs and interests of the student no included in the regular course offerings. Scheduled as needed. Prerequisites: junior or senior status.

Work experience with firm or agency directly related to the student‘s major area of study. The learning experience is structured within the College approved guidelines for the internship program. Through close supervision by the director of interns, faculty advisor and the worksite supervisor, the student works toward achieving goals outlined in the individual learning contract. Normally reserved for third and fourth year students. May be repeated with different topics.

Computer Information Systems Minor (18 credit hours)

The CIS Minor requires the completion of 18 credit hours of computer-related coursework.

CIS Minor - Core

Required courses - 12 credit hours.

The first programming course, required for all Computer Information Systems, Accounting Information Systems, and Mathematics majors. Students use the Visual Studio.Net interface to build GUI (graphical user interface), create multimedia, process files and databases as well as Internet and World Wide Web based client/server networking. Prerequisite: (WED only): CS250, waived for Math majors.

A management-oriented survey course of computer-based information systems (IS) and an overview of IS as a discipline. Presented are a variety of IS concepts and topics used by information specialists, including: hardware, software, systems theory, data organization, telecommunications and networking, decision support, and systems design, with a focus on business information systems.

Presents a practical approach to systems and design, integrating traditional development methods with current technologies. The five phases of the traditional System Development Life Cycle are covered in detail. The various tools and techniques the Systems Analyst, Programmer/Analyst, or IS Manager may use are emphasized. Classical and structured tools for describing data flow, data structures, process flow, file design, input/output design and program specifications are applied to documentation systems. Surveys other important skills for the System Analyst such as fact-finding, communications, project management, and cost/benefit analysis. Prerequisites CS 161 and CS 250.

Presents a practical approach to database design, implementation and maintenance by utilizing Microsoft Access projects to supplement the theory covered in the primary textbook. Covers the fundamental concepts of relational databases and their design including: the DBMS (database management system); the relational model, logical and physical database design; design tools such as E-R diagrams and data flow diagrams; data structures; entities, attributes and tables; the Entity-Relationship model; normalization; and database implementation. Winter, odd years. Prerequisites: CS 161 and CS 250.

CIS Minor - Electives

Choose 2 (6 credit hours) of the following.

Focuses on the nature of law-making, the legal processes by which law is applied to resolve disputes, the value and policy that are the basis for our law and legal processes and the role of law and litigation in the conduct of everyday business affairs. Emphasis is on the fundamentals of the legal system, both philosophical and technical, which facilitate business operations and discourage or control harmful business practices. Ethical implications and standards to which business conduct should conform are considered and stressed.

The second half of CS161. Advanced topics include the use of arrays, creating objects and classes, graphics, files, and multimedia. This course is required of all CIS majors and minors and is recommended for AIS and Digital Media majors. Prerequisites: CS 161 and CS 250.

Introduces students to various concepts and areas of expertise surrounding the field of computer information systems. The Guide to Computer Forensics and Investigation presents proper methods to conduct a computer forensics investigation beginning with a discussion of ethics, while mapping to the objectives of the International Association of Computer Investigative Specialists (IACIS) certification. Students should have a working knowledge of hardware and operating systems to maximize their success on projects and exercises throughout the text. Prerequisites: CJ 111 and CS 101.

An overview of computer telecommunications and networking theories and concepts. Introduces the student to fundamental telecommunications and data communication concepts. Included are various topics such as communications media, equipment and transmission; protocols; network basics; the various LAN topologies; wide area and distributed networks. Network management and information network applications. Prerequisite: CS 250.

A three-hour introduction to various technical and administrative aspects of Information Security and Assurance. Provides the foundation for understanding the key issues associated with protecting information assets, determining the level of protection and response to securiy incidence, and designing a consistent, reasonable information security system, with appropriate intrusion detection and reporting features. Students will be exposed to the spectrum of security activities, methods, methodologies, and procedures. Coverage will include an overview of the Information Security Planning and Staffing functions. This course is geared toward introductory, technical, and managerial students in a lab environment with exercises in various operating systems. Prerequisites: CS 250 and CS 261.

Computer "Core Four" Certification (12 credit hours)

The "Core Four" certification is open to any major.

Core Four Certification

Required courses - 12 credit hours. Open to any major.

The first programming course, required for all Computer Information Systems, Accounting Information Systems, and Mathematics majors. Students use the Visual Studio.Net interface to build GUI (graphical user interface), create multimedia, process files and databases as well as Internet and World Wide Web based client/server networking. Prerequisite: (WED only): CS250, waived for Math majors.

A management-oriented survey course of computer-based information systems (IS) and an overview of IS as a discipline. Presented are a variety of IS concepts and topics used by information specialists, including: hardware, software, systems theory, data organization, telecommunications and networking, decision support, and systems design, with a focus on business information systems.

Presents a practical approach to systems and design, integrating traditional development methods with current technologies. The five phases of the traditional System Development Life Cycle are covered in detail. The various tools and techniques the Systems Analyst, Programmer/Analyst, or IS Manager may use are emphasized. Classical and structured tools for describing data flow, data structures, process flow, file design, input/output design and program specifications are applied to documentation systems. Surveys other important skills for the System Analyst such as fact-finding, communications, project management, and cost/benefit analysis. Prerequisites CS 161 and CS 250.

Presents a practical approach to database design, implementation and maintenance by utilizing Microsoft Access projects to supplement the theory covered in the primary textbook. Covers the fundamental concepts of relational databases and their design including: the DBMS (database management system); the relational model, logical and physical database design; design tools such as E-R diagrams and data flow diagrams; data structures; entities, attributes and tables; the Entity-Relationship model; normalization; and database implementation. Winter, odd years. Prerequisites: CS 161 and CS 250.

Information about Course Requirements
We do our best to keep this information updated, but you should always double-check to ensure you are meeting graduation requirements. For the most current course requirements please review the latest undergraduate college catalog.  Always consult your academic advisor when registering for courses or when you have questions about course requirements.