Course Requirements

The Environmental Sciences minor is appropriate to include with a wide variety of majors since the complex and critical relationship we have with our environment is a vital and growing concern of our society and of students regardless of their major.

In addition, an individualized major in Environmental Sciences utilizes courses in the biology and chemistry areas.

Environmental Science Major

Environmental Science Core (30)

A study of the major unifying concepts of biology at the molecular, cellular and organismic level, including a survey of the major groups of living organisms. Three classes plus one two-hour lab per week. Course fee applies.

A study of the major unifying concepts of biology at the molecular, cellular and organismic level, including a survey of the major groups of living organisms. Three classes plus one two-hour lab per week. Course fee applies. Prerequisite: BI141.

This course uses an interdisciplinary approach to our world to emphasize the history of environmental concerns, biomes, species interactions with each other and their environment, air, water, soil and biological resources, population dynamics, toxicology, energy sources, land use management, and other related topics. Principles of physics, Environmental chemistry, and biology are incorporated throughout the course. Laboratory activities allow direct application of the concepts learned in lecture. Prerequisites: BI141 and BI142 or BI101

Introduces the basic chemical concepts of atomic structure, periodicity, and the chemical reactions of both gases and solutions, and the thermodynamics of these reactions. Three one-hour lectures and one three-hour laboratory. Course fee applies. Prerequisite: one year of high school chemistry or consent of professor.

A continuation of the concepts presented in CH 115 as they pertain to reaction thermodynamics, chemical equilibrium of acid-base and precipitation reactions as well as redox chemistry. The concepts behind solids, both salts and metallic, are also presented. A brief introduction to organic chemistry is included in the course topics. Three one-hour lectures and one three-hour laboratory. Course fee applies. Prerequisite: CH 115.

In this course students will use the fundamental principles of chemistry to gain an understanding of the source, fate, and reactivity of compounds in natural and polluted environments. Emphasis will be placed on the environmental implications of energy utilization and on the chemistry of the atmosphere, hydrosphere, and lithosphere. Environmental issues that will be discussed include climate change, air pollution, stratospheric ozone depletion, pollution and treatment of water sources, the utilization of insecticides and herbicides. The course will included a laboratory component in which students will perform indoor/outoor experimental activities. Prequisites: CH 115 and CH 116.

Math Component

It is highly recommended that students in the environmental science major take MA 253 or BI 253 as the Woods Core math component

An introductory course in mathematical modeling in biology with emphasis on construction and interpretation of models in ecology and environmental science. The goals of the course are to provide training in a wide variety of mathematical and computational techniques that are used to describe ecological systems, to learn to construct ecological models and provide instruction in the biological interpretation of mathematical results. We will study how differential and difference equations are used to model various ecological phenomena including population growth, spread of infectious diseases, habitat fragmentation, competition between species and predator prey relationships, as well as others. We will also consider how uncertainty about different aspects of the process to be modeled can be incorporated into the model. The analysis of these models provides insights into the behavior of different phenomena and suggests various strategies for conservation. The course is taught as lectures and hands-on computer and outdoor lab activities in which students explore models, collect and analyze data, perform simulations and solve problems. Prerequisites: BI141 and BI 142 or BI101 and MA112; MA 120 and MA 121 are highly encouraged.

Chemistry Concentration (15)

Principles of Animal Nutrition deals with the function of nutrients, digestive processes, characterization of feedstuffs, and formulation of diets for domestic animals. Deficiency disorders will also be addressed. Prerequisites: BI 141 and BI 142 or consent of the instructor.

Studies the reactivity of functionalized hydrocarbons through the use of mechanism and orbital considerations. Unsaturated hydrocarbons as well as functional groups containing oxygen and sulfur are considered. Laboratory offers instruction in technique. Three one-hour lectures and one three-hour laboratory. Course fee applies. Prerequisite: CH 116.

Continuation of CH 222 considering additional functional groups such as aromatics, carboxylic acids, esters, and amines. In addition to synthesis, the interpretation of organic spectra is used as a tool for critical thinking. Biochemistry topics that pertain to organic spectra are used as tools for critical thinking. Biochemistry topics that pertain to organic topics are introduced. Laboratory offers instruction in synthesis. Three one-hour lectures and laboratory. Course fee applies. Prerequisite: CH 222.

One semester introductory course designed to give students an appreciation of the dynamic nature of life processes. Chemistry of carbohydrates, lipids, proteins, nucleic acids and enzymes are studied and considered in their role in the metabolism. Some modern biochemical reactions and isolation of compounds from natural sources are included. Three lectures and one three-hour lab. Course fee applies. Prerequisites: CH 115 and CH 116, or consent of instructor.

Biology/Wildlife Concentration (15-16)

Choose either BI 261, ID 460 or BI 335 as part of the concentration, the other two can be used as electives.

Focuses on Indiana's diversity of organisms and ecosystems, including the geological and biological history of the state. Field laboratories will introduce students to the major taxonomic groups of organisms and local Indiana Habitats.

Explores the development, causation, function, and evolution of animal behavior. Examines genetic, physiological, psychological, ecological and evolutionary influences. Investigates the behavior of organisms as individuals and in social groups. Three one-hour lectures and a three-hour laboratory. Course fee applies. Prerequisites: BI 141 and BI 142, or consent of the instructor.

Conservation and management of renewable resources such as soil, water, air, minerals, plants and animals in relation to the total environment.As needed.

Principles and concepts pertaining to the study of organisms and their biotic and a biotic environment. Includes consideration of interrelationships at the level of the individual, population, community and ecosystem. Three lectures and one two-hour laboratory per week. Course fee applies. Prerequisites: BI 141 and BI 142, or instructor‘s consent.

This course examines wildlife as a natural resource, with emphasis on principles of conservation, ecology, and management. This course includes hands-on experiences, analysis of wildlife and natural resource problems and understanding basic ecological concepts associated with wildlife. It also includes habitat management practices, identification of wildlife species, analysis of policies, laws and regualtions, and use and management of nautral resources. Prerequisites: BI 141 and BI 142 or BI101

This course examines what humans eat from multiple disciplines: biology and evolution; agriculture and environmental science; politics, business and economics; history, anthropology and culture; ethics and religion. The course will cover the history of food systems, leading up to a focus on the role of government and business in modern food systems, and the environmental impacts and sustainability of food systems. Finally, the course looks at individual food choices, from several perspectives including: nutrition, ethics, and cultural diversity. Prerequisites: Successful completion of at least one ID 300-level or above.

Electives

Choose two-must be a minimum of 6hrs.

Study of major plant groups, their structure, function and ecological relationships. Prerequisites: BI 141 and 142, or consent of instructor.

Field experiences in environmentally important areas (e.g., desert, grasslands, marshes) of the natural world which introduce the student to the interrelation of nature. Class presentations about the different ecosystems prepare the student for observation and investigation of the habitat; field experience included.

Application of biological principles to the study of the structure, function, origin and development of typical invertebrates. Field work may be required in addition to regular laboratory periods. Three lectures and one two-hour laboratory. Course fee applies. Prerequisites: BI 141 and BI 142.

Introduction to the nutrition, physiology and ecology of microorganisms (bacteria, yeasts, molds and viruses) including preparation of media, role of microorganisms in health and disease and methods of control. Three lectures and one two-hour laboratory. Course fee. Prerequisites: BI 141 and BI 142.

Studies the history of life and the process that produces its diversity and unity. Content includes natural selection, speciation, macroevolution and microevolution.

Research and discussion of one or more topics of current biological interest. For majors only. For those seeking secondary education certification, the topics will include drugs, human nutrition and social biology.As needed. Course fee. Prerequisites: BI 141 and BI 142.

Provides an overview of environmental law that is relevant to the everyday lives of all citizens. As an overview, offers the curious student the resources needed to explore environmental subject areas or issues more fully. Revolves around the primary federal environmental laws such as the Clean Water Act, Clean Air Act, and National Environmental Policy Act. Interesting cases, such as does a cetacean have standing to sue, will be incorporated as learning tools.

Explores the ethical challenge of increased competition for world resources. Examines how changing understandings of stewardship, fairness and rights shape moral choice in issues including distribution of goods, care of nature and care of human populations.Prerequisite: Successful completion of at least one ID 3xx course.

Environmental Sciences Minor (24-25 credit hours)

A minor in Environmental Sciences is advantageous to anyone interested in the interrelatedness of life and the universe. In addition, an individualized major may be developed in this area utilizing courses in the biology and chemistry areas.

Environmental Studies - Required Courses

22-23 credit hours required; all courses listed.

A study of the major unifying concepts of biology at the molecular, cellular and organismic level, including a survey of the major groups of living organisms. Three classes plus one two-hour lab per week. Course fee applies.

A study of the major unifying concepts of biology at the molecular, cellular and organismic level, including a survey of the major groups of living organisms. Three classes plus one two-hour lab per week. Course fee applies. Prerequisite: BI141.

Field experiences in environmentally important areas (e.g., desert, grasslands, marshes) of the natural world which introduce the student to the interrelation of nature. Class presentations about the different ecosystems prepare the student for observation and investigation of the habitat; field experience included.

Principles and concepts pertaining to the study of organisms and their biotic and a biotic environment. Includes consideration of interrelationships at the level of the individual, population, community and ecosystem. Three lectures and one two-hour laboratory per week. Course fee applies. Prerequisites: BI 141 and BI 142, or instructor‘s consent.

This course uses an interdisciplinary approach to our world to emphasize the history of environmental concerns, biomes, species interactions with each other and their environment, air, water, soil and biological resources, population dynamics, toxicology, energy sources, land use management, and other related topics. Principles of physics, Environmental chemistry, and biology are incorporated throughout the course. Laboratory activities allow direct application of the concepts learned in lecture. Prerequisites: BI141 and BI142 or BI101

Environmental Studies - Electives

Choose one of the following course options (at least 3 credit hours required).

Study of major plant groups, their structure, function and ecological relationships. Prerequisites: BI 141 and 142, or consent of instructor.

Standard topics of elementary statistics: organization of data, normal distributions, estimation, hypothesis testing, correlation and regression, chi-square and analysis of variance. Additional emphasis on selection of methods and applications to biology, particularly genetics and for undergraduate research. Use of appropriate software. Three hours concurrent with MA 253.As needed. Prerequisite: BI141 and BI 142 or consent of the instructor.

Field experiences in environmentally important areas (e.g., desert, grasslands, marshes) of the natural world which introduce the student to the interrelation of nature. Class presentations about the different ecosystems prepare the student for observation and investigation of the habitat; field experience included.

Explores the development, causation, function, and evolution of animal behavior. Examines genetic, physiological, psychological, ecological and evolutionary influences. Investigates the behavior of organisms as individuals and in social groups. Three one-hour lectures and a three-hour laboratory. Course fee applies. Prerequisites: BI 141 and BI 142, or consent of the instructor.

Conservation and management of renewable resources such as soil, water, air, minerals, plants and animals in relation to the total environment.As needed.

Studies the history of life and the process that produces its diversity and unity. Content includes natural selection, speciation, macroevolution and microevolution.

This course examines wildlife as a natural resource, with emphasis on principles of conservation, ecology, and management. This course includes hands-on experiences, analysis of wildlife and natural resource problems and understanding basic ecological concepts associated with wildlife. It also includes habitat management practices, identification of wildlife species, analysis of policies, laws and regualtions, and use and management of nautral resources. Prerequisites: BI 141 and BI 142 or BI101

Research and discussion of one or more topics of current biological interest. For majors only. For those seeking secondary education certification, the topics will include drugs, human nutrition and social biology.As needed. Course fee. Prerequisites: BI 141 and BI 142.

Provides an overview of environmental law that is relevant to the everyday lives of all citizens. As an overview, offers the curious student the resources needed to explore environmental subject areas or issues more fully. Revolves around the primary federal environmental laws such as the Clean Water Act, Clean Air Act, and National Environmental Policy Act. Interesting cases, such as does a cetacean have standing to sue, will be incorporated as learning tools.

This course examines what humans eat from multiple disciplines: biology and evolution; agriculture and environmental science; politics, business and economics; history, anthropology and culture; ethics and religion. The course will cover the history of food systems, leading up to a focus on the role of government and business in modern food systems, and the environmental impacts and sustainability of food systems. Finally, the course looks at individual food choices, from several perspectives including: nutrition, ethics, and cultural diversity. Prerequisites: Successful completion of at least one ID 300-level or above.

An introductory course in mathematical modeling in biology with emphasis on construction and interpretation of models in ecology and environmental science. The goals of the course are to provide training in a wide variety of mathematical and computational techniques that are used to describe ecological systems, to learn to construct ecological models and provide instruction in the biological interpretation of mathematical results. We will study how differential and difference equations are used to model various ecological phenomena including population growth, spread of infectious diseases, habitat fragmentation, competition between species and predator prey relationships, as well as others. We will also consider how uncertainty about different aspects of the process to be modeled can be incorporated into the model. The analysis of these models provides insights into the behavior of different phenomena and suggests various strategies for conservation. The course is taught as lectures and hands-on computer and outdoor lab activities in which students explore models, collect and analyze data, perform simulations and solve problems. Prerequisites: BI141 and BI 142 or BI101 and MA112; MA 120 and MA 121 are highly encouraged.

Environmental Studies Minor (18-19 credit hours)

A minor in Environmental Studies helps students understand the interconnections within the natural world and with human society. Information about the environment, sustainability, conservation, energy and climate change are the types of topics to be discussed. This minor is appropriate to include with a wide variety of majors since the complex critical relationship we have with our environment is a vital and growing concern of our society and of all students regardless of their major.

Environmental Studies Minor - Required Courses

15-16 credit hours total.

Choose one of the following courses (3-4 credit hours).

For the student interested in environmental issues, an introduction to questions related to the environment. Ecosystems and the human impact on ecosystems as population density increases will be included. Different kinds of environmental damage and their problems will be discussed as well as peace and justice issues in the environmental arena.

Conservation and management of renewable resources such as soil, water, air, minerals, plants and animals in relation to the total environment.As needed.

All of the following courses are required.

Focuses on Indiana's diversity of organisms and ecosystems, including the geological and biological history of the state. Field laboratories will introduce students to the major taxonomic groups of organisms and local Indiana Habitats.

Provides an overview of environmental law that is relevant to the everyday lives of all citizens. As an overview, offers the curious student the resources needed to explore environmental subject areas or issues more fully. Revolves around the primary federal environmental laws such as the Clean Water Act, Clean Air Act, and National Environmental Policy Act. Interesting cases, such as does a cetacean have standing to sue, will be incorporated as learning tools.

Work experience with a firm or agency directly related to the student’s major area of study. The learning experience is structured within the College approved guidelines for the internship program. Through close supervision by the director of interns, faculty advisor and the worksite supervisor, the student works toward achieving goals outlined in the individual learning contract.

Additional General Studies Science:
Choose one of the following courses (3 credit hours).

A study of the normal integrated functioning of the human organism in the context of principles and concepts relating the human organism to its environment. The major unifying concept of biology – evolution – is used as a framework for this study. Emphasis is placed on the scientific method and other problem-solving techniques. Fulfills general studies requirement. Course fee applies. Prerequisite: Score of 38 or better on mathematics placement exam or completion of MA 101.

Offers a basic knowledge of the science of chemistry as a tool for understanding the physical world. With this knowledge, we examine the following: how scientists approach and solve problems and how chemistry-related concepts appear in our day-to-day lives. No prior chemistry background is assumed. Fulfills general studies requirement. Prerequisites: Score of 38 or better on mathematics placement test or completion of MA 101. Course fee applies.

Environmental Studies Minor - Electives

Choose one course (3 credit hours) from the options shown:

Explores the ethical challenge of increased competition for world resources. Examines how changing understandings of stewardship, fairness and rights shape moral choice in issues including distribution of goods, care of nature and care of human populations.Prerequisite: Successful completion of at least one ID 3xx course.

This course examines what humans eat from multiple disciplines: biology and evolution; agriculture and environmental science; politics, business and economics; history, anthropology and culture; ethics and religion. The course will cover the history of food systems, leading up to a focus on the role of government and business in modern food systems, and the environmental impacts and sustainability of food systems. Finally, the course looks at individual food choices, from several perspectives including: nutrition, ethics, and cultural diversity. Prerequisites: Successful completion of at least one ID 300-level or above.

Information about Course Requirements
We do our best to keep this information updated, but you should always double-check to ensure you are meeting graduation requirements. For the most current course requirements please review the latest undergraduate college catalog.  Always consult your academic advisor when registering for courses or when you have questions about course requirements.