History / Political Science / Pre-Law at the Woods

Students planning to enter the legal profession are advised to pursue a rigorous course of study best suited to their interests whether that be with a history degree, political science degree or pre-law degree. Law schools seek students who can communicate effectively, read comprehensively, reason logically, and think critically. Law school admission requirements vary, and students are advised to be acquainted with the specific requirements of the schools in which they are interested. This program is one appropriate major for students aspiring to a career as an attorney.

 

Course Requirements

History Major / Political Science Major / Pre-Law Major
(42 credit hours)

This major is designed for students who may pursue careers in government, politics or history, or who may seek admission to law school. While no undergraduate program is required for, or guarantees admittance to, law school, courses in legal research, critical thinking, and reasoning give graduates of this program a strong foundation for further study of the law.

Major - Required Courses

42 credit hours; all courses listed.

Introduces the study of political science, demonstrating those aspects of human behavior which the political scientist examines and the research tools employed. Explores the nature and purpose of politics, and patterns of authority, citizenship and political change. The goal is a solid theoretical framework for use in studying both American institutions and processes and other political systems in the world today.

Course description not available.

Discusses and analyzes the processes of agenda setting, formulation, implementation and evaluation of public policies regarding selected issues such as housing, land use, health care and social services.

Studies the constitutional basis, organization and workings of state and local government. Emphasizes the interrelationships of states and their political subdivisions and the functioning of state and local politics.

Choose 9 credit hours of history electives to complete this program of study. Consult with your academic advisor to pick courses that will qualify.

Survey of European influences in exploration; the colonial, revolutionary and federal periods; sectional rivalries that led to the Civil War; the Civil War and Reconstruction. Emphasis is given to the U.S. Constitution and to the development of political and economic systems.

Survey of the post-Civil War period beginning with the Industrial Age. Major consideration is given to the rise of the United States as a world power; causes and effects of the World Wars; the Cold War; Korea and Vietnam; and such contemporary topics as popular dissent, urban crises, the impact of mass media; and the end of the Cold War and the advent of the ―New World Order.

A study of the evolution of the United States into a world power; development of foreign policy, its justification and motivating causal factors; and the moral implications of these policies. Examination of the change from rural-agrarian society to urban-industrial and militarized society, its impact on foreign policy, the individual and American citizens.

Study of the origin and development of the United States Constitution from the eighteenth century to the present; shows how the era and social and political conditions affected constitutional evolution; judicial appointments and their impact on Supreme Court decisions which shape contemporary and future society.

The study of law and the legal system. Introduces case law, analysis and ethical consideration in our world. Provides an overview of the courts, civil and criminal procedure, torts, contracts, property law and the individual's rights. An excellent course for any student because of its practical, universal content and for students who are interested in attending law school. Fulfills general studies requirement.

Students gain an understanding of legal resource materials and basis techniques of legal research through federal and state case law, statutes, encyclopedias, administrative material, Shepards and other sources. Extensive hands-on exercises in the law library. Excellent for students planning to attend law school. Course fee. Prerequisite: PL200.

In this largely hands-on experience, students will be exposed to the many ways that computers are being used in law offices and other legal settings. The primary focus is WESTLAW, but students will be introduced to database systems for litigation support and timekeeping, spreadsheets, docket control and others. Course fee. Prerequisites: PL 200, PL 231.

Presents basic principles of research design and primary techniques used by social scientists in the collection and analysis of data. For example, surveys and polling, observation, experiment, case study and content analysis.Prerequisite: SO 211 or instructor‘s consent.

Major - Required in General Studies

The following courses are required for this major and count towards general studies course requirements.

An overview of contemporary psychology introducing students to: human development, cognition and language, learning, memory, sensation, perception, motivation, emotion, biological basis of behavior, social psychology, personality, psychopathology and psychotherapy. The focus of the course is on both the scientific method of acquiring psychological data, as well as the theories which interpret that data and help guide further research in the field. For majors and non-majors, this course also serves as the prerequisite for most psychology classes. Fulfills general studies requirement.

Studies the basic principles, perspectives and concepts of sociology. Broad overview with emphasis on social structure, social interaction, culture, socialization, groups, formal organization, stratification, social institutions and social change. Fulfills general studies requirement.

History Minor (18 credit hours)

The history minor is a valuable addition to any liberal arts major. Students from other disciplines also find that an understanding of history adds to their knowledge base and helps to diversify their career options.

History Minor - Required Courses

18 credit hours required, including 9 credit hours of approved history electives.

Choose 9 credit hours of approved history electives. Consult with your academic adviser for further details.

Survey of European influences in exploration; the colonial, revolutionary and federal periods; sectional rivalries that led to the Civil War; the Civil War and Reconstruction. Emphasis is given to the U.S. Constitution and to the development of political and economic systems.

Survey of the post-Civil War period beginning with the Industrial Age. Major consideration is given to the rise of the United States as a world power; causes and effects of the World Wars; the Cold War; Korea and Vietnam; and such contemporary topics as popular dissent, urban crises, the impact of mass media; and the end of the Cold War and the advent of the ―New World Order.

Survey of various world civilizations beginning with the 1600s and concluding with the present time. Emphasis is given to evolving cross-cultural influences, the evolution of power politics, rise of capitalism and imperialism, the socialist, fascist and Marxist revolutionary movements and the dynamics of the modern Third World.

Information about Course Requirements
We do our best to keep this information updated, but you should always double-check to ensure you are meeting graduation requirements. For the most current course requirements please review the latest undergraduate college catalog.  Always consult your academic advisor when registering for courses or when you have questions about course requirements.

 

Unauthorized Practice of Law (UPL)
Each state defines and regulates the practice of law within its jurisdiction, usually through state Supreme Court rules. In addition to the criminal sanctions for practicing law without a license, some states may make civil remedies available to a client who has been fraudulently represented by a person who is not a licensed attorney. Each state charges an ethics committee with implementing the practice rules and with the administration of professional discipline. Although the responsible agency may differ from state to state, there is uniformity among the states in providing some type of student practice rules, rules for professional responsibility and regulation of licensed attorneys, and for criminal sanctions for the unauthorized practice of law.

All states have general statutes which limit the practice of law to licensed attorneys. The way each state defines UPL, if it is defined at all, differs greatly. UPL laws are open to interpretation by the courts and each jurisdiction differs in its activities and interpretations. Generally, the practice of law has been recognized to include: (1) accepting cases from a client; (2) setting fees; (3) giving legal advice, thereby rendering independent legal judgment on behalf of a client; (4) preparing or signing legal documents; and (5) appearing in a representative capacity before a court or other adjudicatory body. You need to be familiar with the UPL rules and regulations for the state within which you are working.